historyfan:

A tin type. The photograph likely dates from the 1880’s based on the bustle dresses.

historyfan:

A tin type. The photograph likely dates from the 1880’s based on the bustle dresses.

Reblogged from Historyfan
teachingliteracy:

halfletterpress:

U.S. soldiers getting library books from truck, Kelly  Field Library (1909-1920)
The Library of Congress is a resource we return to often. It is full of absolutely amazing images like this one of a bookmobile for soldiers.

teachingliteracy:

halfletterpress:

U.S. soldiers getting library books from truck, Kelly Field Library (1909-1920)

The Library of Congress is a resource we return to often. It is full of absolutely amazing images like this one of a bookmobile for soldiers.

Reblogged from teaching literacy.
historyfan:

The Time magazine issue of March 24th 1930.
The accompanining piece is well worth a read and puts the reader into the heyday of gansters and when Capone was a celebrity.
Link to the piece:-
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,738873-1,00.html

historyfan:

The Time magazine issue of March 24th 1930.

The accompanining piece is well worth a read and puts the reader into the heyday of gansters and when Capone was a celebrity.

Link to the piece:-

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,738873-1,00.html

Reblogged from Historyfan
historyfan:

The propellers of the Titanic.

historyfan:

The propellers of the Titanic.

Reblogged from Historyfan
yama-bato:

God in Glory at the Last Judgment Troyes Master
Hours, for Troyes use France, Troyes, c. 1390 and 1450 (Private Collection, f. 131).
This early Book of Hours includes high quality illumination by the  individualistic Troyes Master, an artist who produced many manuscripts  for patrons located in the area of Champagne, including a Missal for the  Church of Evry-le-Chatel near Troyes.
http://www.medievalbooksofhours.com/advancedtutorial/tutorial_advanced_onlinetutorial_images_texts.html#suffrage

yama-bato:

God in Glory at the Last Judgment
Troyes Master

Hours, for Troyes use France, Troyes, c. 1390 and 1450 (Private Collection, f. 131).

This early Book of Hours includes high quality illumination by the individualistic Troyes Master, an artist who produced many manuscripts for patrons located in the area of Champagne, including a Missal for the Church of Evry-le-Chatel near Troyes.

http://www.medievalbooksofhours.com/advancedtutorial/tutorial_advanced_onlinetutorial_images_texts.html#suffrage

Reblogged from COULEURS
trebaolofarabia:


historyfan:
An official description to go with this photograph: “September 1935: German cavalry firing from the standing saddle position during maneuvers on the Karshorter Racecourse, Berlin”
Pretty cool I think. Its interesting as I know of one cavalry unit during the Napoleonic Wars which did similar positions using rifles. This I believe was Prussian.

Well when it came to cavalry a lot of innovation was done at the time of the Napoleonic Wars which stopped after that. For example the British even after World War I still had a nominal belief that cavalry could still be a a powerful weapon on the battlefield. It’s hard for us now to recognize just how dominant the notion of horseback cavalry was for most of human history, there was this simple expectation that once tanks, cars, and aeroplanes sorted themselves out you’d once again see lancers storming over the field. As such German cavalry in ‘35 doing maneuvers invented in 1805 makes fairly common sense with the way military tactics and tradition had survived through the rapid changes of the early 20th century.

trebaolofarabia:

historyfan:

An official description to go with this photograph: “September 1935: German cavalry firing from the standing saddle position during maneuvers on the Karshorter Racecourse, Berlin”

Pretty cool I think. Its interesting as I know of one cavalry unit during the Napoleonic Wars which did similar positions using rifles. This I believe was Prussian.

Well when it came to cavalry a lot of innovation was done at the time of the Napoleonic Wars which stopped after that. For example the British even after World War I still had a nominal belief that cavalry could still be a a powerful weapon on the battlefield. It’s hard for us now to recognize just how dominant the notion of horseback cavalry was for most of human history, there was this simple expectation that once tanks, cars, and aeroplanes sorted themselves out you’d once again see lancers storming over the field. As such German cavalry in ‘35 doing maneuvers invented in 1805 makes fairly common sense with the way military tactics and tradition had survived through the rapid changes of the early 20th century.

Reblogged from Trebaol of Arabia